How to make Gyoza (Fried Dumpling)

I love gyoza. My lil girl love gyoza. JP love gyoza too. It is a snack that is both comforting and filling to the tummy. We often pay RM10 for 4 pieces of gyoza to be share among 3 of us. It is nice but we never have enough. My Hungarian friend has been asking me to share with her some Chinese dishes and I think this will be a good dish. So, I decided I should try it from home.

gyoza_servehot

Here’s the list of ingredient I used

Mince Pork – 500 gsm
Shitake Mushroom – 4 pieces
Spring Onion – 3 stalks
Red Carrot – 1 medium size
Dumpling Skin (Ready Pack) – 1 Pack

gyoza_ingredient

Marination:
Lite Soy Source – 6 Table spoon
Sesame Source – 1 teaspoon
White Pepper – 1 table spoon
Chinese Rice Wine (Chao Xing) – 1 tablespoon
Corn Flour – 4 table spoon

gyoze_marinate

Here’s my simple steps. Add in 6 tablespoon of lite soya source, 1 table spoon of Chinese Rice wine, 1 tea spoon of sesame oil, 1 table spoon of white pepper. Picture below are the Chinese Rice wine I used.

 

gyoza_ricewine

Then, mix well. Do taste the meat if is salty enough. The mixture to be a little salty because we need to add other fresh ingredient to balance the overall taste. Then, put in 4 table spoon of corn flour to marry all the mixture together. Corn flour also make the meat more tender.

gyoza_cornflour

I cut my Shitake mushroom and soak them inside hot water to reduce the wood taste. While soaking the mushroom, I shred the carrot and cut the spring onion finely. Last, I cut the Shitake mushroom to same small size.

gyoza_cut

I mix all the vegetable into the marinated pork and mix well. You can also use other ingredient like leek, corn, garlic, onion, ginger, jiuchai and etc. Just cut the ingredient finely before mixing. Beside, do not mix more then 3 types of  ingredient. The taste will be too overwhelming. It should be in the ratio of  5 Meat: 1 vege: 1 vege: 1 vege. Garlic and ginger need to use in moderation unless you love the sharp taste.

gyoza_mixall

I have my dumpling mixture ready and my packet of dumpling skin I bought from local supermarket.

gyoza_ready2pack

Place the dumpling skin on a dry surface, take a tablespoon of the mixture and place it in the middle. Draw half circle with clean drinking water around the edge of the dumpling skin. Fold the dumpling to half and ensure the 2 side of the dumpling skin stick together.

gyoza_meatin

You can fold the skin in scallop shape to ensure the skin is close tied. Else, using your finger to press them together and ensure no hole in between. Meanwhile, put a pot of water to boil while you insert the mixture into the dumpling skin.

gyoza_folded

Now all your dumpling is done, throw the dumpling inside the boiling water, one by one. The dumpling will stay in shape if the wrapping is done well.

gyoza_hotboilwater

Depending on the size of your pot, be sure to leave enough room for the dumpling so they won’t stick to one another. Do feel free to use the scoop to help the dumpling. I throw in 8-12 dumpling into my medium size pot. When the dumpling is floating on top of the water, means they are ready!

gyoza_floated

Lift it up and directly transfer them into a frying pan which was heat up with 2 table spoon oil (medium fire). It is ok that your dumpling is still sticky and wet. The moisture will help the dumpling to coat with the oil in the pan well. If your frying pan not too heavy, do flip the dumpling by shaking the pan front and back. Else, add more oil and flip with your spatula often so they don’t stick to the pan, or one another.

gyoza_panfried

When the skin start to crisp up. Your dumpling is ready! 🙂

gyoza_readyfried

Eat with Black Vinegar. Enjoy! 🙂

 

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5 comments

    • Hie AgileWriter, I just notice your message is directed to spam by WordPress. I am glad that I found out. 🙂 Yes, I am Chinese who is fond with Chinese food. However, I live in a multi-culture country call Malaysia. So, my Chinese food has lotsa influence of spice and ingredient which is not common in typical Chinese food. Let me share some later in days to come later. 🙂

      • From the food you describe, you love strong flavour Chinese dishes. I will try to put up some food post. Your info on the dumpling is very comprehensive. Nice job! Chinese from Malaysia mostly origin from the Southern side of China. Hence, our style of cooking varies according to our ethnic group too. I am a Teo Chew. 🙂 I will share more on my ethnic group type of food. For the Teo Chew, we only eat our dumpling sweet with ginger coconut sugar soup.

      • Oh!!
        Now my post is a success. Yeah, I do a good research B4 writing such blogs.
        Glad to know that you found it informative. 🙂


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